Hamlet act 2 quotes 2 essay

Most like a gentleman, with the greatest courtesy. Warburton therefore would transpose Niggard and Most free.

Hamlet act 2 quotes 2 essay

Act V, scene ii Summary: He tells Horatio that he has no sympathy for Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who betrayed him and catered to Claudius, but that he feels sorry for having behaved with such hostility toward Laertes. Their conversation is interrupted by Osric, a foolish courtier.

Osric tries to flatter Hamlet by agreeing with everything Hamlet says, even when he contradicts himself; in the space of seconds, he agrees first that it is cold, then that it is hot.

He has come to tell them that Claudius wants Hamlet to fence with Laertes and that the king has made a wager with Laertes that Hamlet will win. Then Osric begins to praise Laertes effusively, though Hamlet and Horatio are unable to determine what point he is trying to make with his overly elaborate proclamations.

Finally, a lord enters and asks Hamlet if he is ready to come to the match, as the king and queen are expecting him. The court marches into the hall, and Hamlet asks Laertes for forgiveness, claiming that it was his madness, and not his own will, that murdered Polonius.

Laertes says that he will not forgive Hamlet until an elder, an expert in the fine points of honor, has advised him in the matter. Hamlet strikes Laertes but declines to drink from the cup, saying that he will play another hit first.

He hits Laertes again, and Gertrude rises to drink from the cup. The king tells her not to drink, but she does so anyway. Laertes remarks under his breath that to wound Hamlet with the poisoned sword is almost against his conscience.

But they fight again, and Laertes scores a hit against Hamlet, drawing blood. The queen moans that the cup must have been poisoned, calls out to Hamlet, and dies. Laertes tells Hamlet that he, too, has been slain, by his own poisoned sword, and that the king is to blame both for the poison on the sword and for the poison in the cup.

Hamlet, in a fury, runs Claudius through with the poisoned sword and forces him to drink down the rest of the poisoned wine. Claudius dies crying out for help. Hamlet tells Horatio that he is dying and exchanges a last forgiveness with Laertes, who dies after absolving Hamlet.

The sound of marching echoes through the hall, and a shot rings out nearby. Osric declares that Fortinbras has come in conquest from Poland and now fires a volley to the English ambassadors. Hamlet tells Horatio again that he is dying, and urges his friend not to commit suicide in light of all the tragedies, but instead to stay alive and tell his story.

Thesis Statements and Important Quotes from Hamlet by Shakespeare

He says that he wishes Fortinbras to be made King of Denmark; then he dies. Fortinbras marches into the room accompanied by the English ambassadors, who announce that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead. Horatio says that he will tell everyone assembled the story that led to the gruesome scene now on display.

Fortinbras orders for Hamlet to be carried away like a soldier.Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular, and most puzzling, play.

It follows the form of a "revenge tragedy," in which the hero, Hamlet, seeks vengeance against his father's murderer, his uncle Claudius, now the king of Denmark.

Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular, and most puzzling, play. It follows the form of a "revenge tragedy," in which the hero, Hamlet, seeks vengeance against his father's murderer, his uncle Claudius, now the king of Denmark.

Act 2 Scene 2 of William Shakespeare's Macbeth Essay Words | 5 Pages. Act 2 Scene 2 of William Shakespeare's Macbeth The main theses in Act 2 Scene 2 are good and evil, light and dark, ambition, time, clothing, blood, sleep and chaos and order.

A summary of Act II, scene ii in William Shakespeare's Hamlet.

Hamlet act 2 quotes 2 essay

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Hamlet and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Said by Hamlet to himself; part of a soliloquy; he believes that his plan with the players and the play will reveal that the ghost told the truth and that Claudius did have something to do with his father’s death.

() First, this seems to be Hamlet telling Rosencrantz and Guildenstern that he knows exactly what they're up to: spying on him. But we also included this as a little .

SparkNotes: Romeo and Juliet: Act 3, scenes 2–4, page 2